My on-line diary began in the 1990's from my studio in the North of England. After a lapse of ten years, I resumed posting from my present studio on the Caribbean island of Dominica.

From the far beginning, the intention has been to give an insight into my working methods, and to share the triumphs, trials and tribulations of work-in-progress.

My diary pages are followed by thousands of artists, art students and art lovers in over 50 countries.

Friday, March 4, 2011

Through the eyes of a child…

Researchers claim that we are born with 98% of the creative potential of genius, but by the time we reach adulthood, the potential has diminished to a fraction of 1%.   Picasso said, “It took me four years to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child.”

I remember as a young child filling countless exercise books with hundreds of imaginative drawings.  Some, I still hold in my memory.  Our eight-year-old son Tristan has being doing the same since he was old enough to hold a pencil. 

The drawing reproduced below is one he made when he was five.  It is his vision of the stately domain that he’ll build when he grows up.  If you look closely, you will see the house, the cars, the yacht, the driveway, the garden and the river leading to the sea.  You will also see that he has signed his work!


He has also inherited from his great grandfather, grandfather, and me, the mind of an inventive engineer.  He spent today helping me to reassemble the chiming clock mechanism that I featured a week or so ago.  It was his keen eyesight and steady hand that finally slipped the delicate grass-hopper escapement in place.  Then, with a gentle nudge of the pendulum, the clock made its first tick-tock.  His great grandfather Enoch Burnett, a clock maker by trade, would have been proud of him!

3 comments:

  1. I have seen a number of drawings done by 8 year olds, many of which aren't a patch on this creation by Tristan when he was five! Brilliant imagination and expression!

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  2. This is wonderful, Roger. I'm afraid, all too often, natural ability is educated out of us. Hold on to your talent, Tristan!

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  3. Brilliant and creative....Tristan was only a baby when I saw him last!

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